Getting Things Done…

Source: Getting Things Done…

Advertisements

Leave a comment

Filed under Uncategorized

Now for the fun part!

A Day in the Writing Life AM to PM

November Workshop with Madrona Troupe

Tom Trimbath 

Author
Editor
Technology Coach

 Jo Meador

Author
Editor
Writing Coach

trimbathcreative.wordpress.com http://www.jomeador.com

 

8:30-9:00 Introduction – both presenters and attendees

9:00-10:15 Jo Meador – Writing for Story
10:30-11:45 Jo Meador – Editing and Polishing Your Drafts

11:45-12:30 Lunch break

12:30-1:45 Tom Trimbath – Writing for the Internet
2:00-3:15 Tom Trimbath – Modern Self-Publishing

3:30-4:30 General Q&A

$80 for the entire day /or $25 per session

Veteran’s Day in Langley writing among the trees.
What could be more fun?

Leave a comment

Filed under Craft, revision work, Story, writing work

What next?

I have spent the past 3 months preparing for the marketing and distribution of the book that was published on June 30. A cautionary note to those selfie-publishers: there’s still a lot of writing to do. This time the verbiage is about the book, not the fun stuff that you want to put into your second book. That material still lies in files and notes and in my head.

Now you get to write about the story you were so glad to be done with after years of mulling it over. Now come the blurbs for online books, for distribution catalogs and for other great sites like Goodreads. Then the distribution of copies to local book stores, local events on signings and readings. Pretty soon the marketing gods have sucked up three months of your time.

And you still want to write, research and create that new project.

May the sales gods be with you.

Leave a comment

Filed under Getting It Out, Writer to Novelist

On Storytelling

So, at last, I’ve published The Book. It’s been years in the making.

At the start of this journey I was dwelling in limbo as “storytelling issues” cast a pallor over my first two novels, mysteries. Two words easily thrown about by agents and publishing house editors dismissively. I had clearly missed the mark on my stories, yet in 2000, few people were able to articulate exactly what that meant.

I could never quite get the hang of it myself. It was like scanning photographs of trees climbing up a mountainside, with close-ups of individual trees, diverse colors and textures of bark, leaves in all shapes of yellow and green, and other indications of tree culture but having no inkling of where the forest began or ended.

To me storytelling belonged to the fields of history, religion or culture. Oral traditions were the library of origination tales, told around campfires by native American songsters, or the stuff of Appalachian tall tale competitions, or the ancient myths of earliest peoples. I did not understand in these traditions the story models I had spent years studying in literature and fiction writing, that is, of characters wandering around a setting in search of a plot.

While pursuing research on the storytelling topic, in 2001, I was compelled to examine the ideals of love through my writing. Provoked  by the loss of my dearest friend and sister, I was drawn to understand as best I could the complexity of memory and shared relationships that defined the love between us. Not a romance or a love story, but a tale about love lost while we are chasing illusive dreams into an undefined future. In every scene and conflict and event of that book, I tried to find or chase down the story that bound these characters yet I never found it. It turned out that story is what finally happened when I let the characters free to pursue their individual paths through the pages.

These days everyone seems to be pitching storytelling: it’s the key to creating great essays, great copy, great films, novels, poetry collections, even poems. I have finished four classes in the past year on storytelling from a range of sources. All cover similar approaches and the same steps from beginning to end processes.

This is a worthy tool to add to your writer’s tool kit. Although exposition varies dependent on how well the author understands the underlying concepts, structural concepts and tenets of storytelling are easy to grasp. The challenge comes in how much you believe in the usefulness of the tools.

By far my favorite book on the subject came by way of my six-year-old granddaughter, who is a fan of Nick Bruel’s Bad Kitty books. In Bad Kitty Drawn To Trouble, Bruel not only teaches first graders how to draw his mischievous character, but leads them along on a journey through character, setting, plot, rising conflict, obstacles, theme and resolution as well. And he does so with great affection and humor. It’s a great primer on story telling, and a great story to read too.

The most useful storytelling guidelines are those that keep you writing your story in your own words, providing just enough encouragement to keep your reader riding shotgun alongside you through the journey.

The rules can assist but offer little help in creating the recipe for your story. Only you, the writer, can do that.

Leave a comment

Filed under Uncategorized

Hope Springs Eternal…

And so all my hopes and prayers and sweat and tears have finally roiled themselves into the story that forms my first published novel, There is Love. Published on June 30th from Abbott Press.

In all these years, I’ve chased ideas through words and sentences around the page, I’ve flung out scenes and settings at unwitting writing groups. I’ve marched drafts before fellow travelers such as editors and classmates. Crafting my wilting pages to obey the warpings of constant critique and rewrites.

And now it is DONE.

For better or worse, it’s in the public eye.

Is it THE END?
Of my writing? NO!
Of this book? Not quite.

Now LET THE MARKETING BEGIN!

The fourth wall…the reading by others…the critiques of buyers yet unspoken who make their approvals known in substantive support at the bookseller.

MARKETING is, of course a horse of a different color!

Leave a comment

Filed under Craft, Getting It Out, Writer to Novelist, writing work

On Publishing What? A Cautionary Tale

I finally submitted my novel to a fee-based publisher four months after my mother died.  The fees  were to cover editing, printing, marketing materials, distribution and several bound copies of the books as well as distribution. My manuscript was “approved for publication” after three months of waiting for initial “content” editing. I was thrilled.

It took several more weeks before I received a detailed scrub of my first chapter.  A “developmental” editing was required to ready the book for publishing. Huh? My education on levels of publishing houses and editorial phases had begun. For a mere eight thousand dollars, the editor would help me shape up the book for the market.   Was this the same editor who had done did the “content” editing? A person to whom I had been denied access to during the four-month setup process.

The editorial status had been communicated to me by a new recruit, who was not the same  editor who had executed the actual scrubbing of my first chapter. I was informed that the editor’s thorough examination of my first ten pages had revealed adequate writing, but demonstrated “structural problems.” She (the scrub editor)  got that out of 10 pages into a 400 page novel. I questioned that I needed “developmental” editing for a novel. What exactly would she be developing, without any knowledge of the story arc or its intention?

I had the rudimentary structure of story. It was no page turner, but had a decent beginning, middle and end. In all the writing classes and master’s program classes I had taken no one had ever mentioned “developmental” editing to me. Plenty of people had read the book and it had passed my dissertation committee.

The term “developmental” editing was not a foreign one, though. I had spent 25 years writing user guides for computing systems, business proposals fifty to one hundred pages in length, education programs and curricula for several training programs, and led a variety of task forces on creating healthy publishing projects for internal or external publishing.

Developmental editing referred to the technical breakdown of the writing pieces from executive summary to detailed specifications. It was the breakdown of the project so that many  writers could be assigned to work on different pieces of the project. This experiential definition did not equate to my understanding of “the novel.”

Then I did what I always do when faced with overwhelming ignorance. I started reading books on editing, from first draft to final novel, on how to breakdown the editing process, on how to create that final work. Some of the books were written by fiction writers who turn over the editing process to others. Some of those books gave advice in breaking down writing projects as if they were of engineering projects. More than a few advised against the writer editing her own work.

After six months of applying different approaches to my work, the story was even more fractured than the “approved” version I had submitted to the publisher. I abandoned the choppy technical process, deciding to go back to storytelling at a future date, quit the work at once, and languished in a state of separation anxiety from my dream of being a “published author.”

I gave up creative writing and turned to my faithful old journal and its tacit commands for me to speak the truth, be open, and accept everything.

I then thoroughly doused myself in Netflix and Acorn binges. After years of media  drought, I allowed myself to be inundated with stories, any stories, good stories, active stories, suspenseful stories, and imaginative stories.

The dried-out well was filling with story again. My love for writing– moving the pen across the page–began to flourish. Untold tales rose up, old characters embraced me once more: Tess, Steve, Charles, Clarke, Moira, Kate, and so many others. Gloriously, I was now tempering a new respect for all the work I had accomplished and discovering new-found hope for situations and problems yet to come.

This year I am revisiting my unpublished novel with a fresh eye and heightened imagination. Still under contract with the publisher,  I plan to finish the book this year. Stories pop up daily begging for attention, Mother’s oral stories of her family and childhood, Father’s stories of his wild youth in San Francisco and the Sonoma valley ranch.

My imagination swathes these people and places into stories of intrigue, secret longings, and nefarious adventures.Thankfully, I have a small group of diverse writers who help me attack the “developmental  editing” week by week.

Keep your writing dream alive. First and foremost, write for yourself.

2 Comments

Filed under Getting It Out

Lessons from the Front: On Revising My Novel

The emerging novelist has had a difficult time keeping up the nagging demands of blog-life, obviously. The past months have eroded to passive regrouping of my energies after submitting a novel for editorial consideration. End result: my story is too long (especially for a first novel). It has too much dead space (more on that below) and a story line that protracts into several long and dull passages. The writing while at times lyrical is not consistently so.

I summarize in my own words from editorial comments of a handful of readers. Editors are fine for making generic comments, but they leave the interpretation up to you. The problem here is a writer (me) is that I cannot fathom exactly how I need to proceed in order to fix the issues. I am a person who ripped out 5″ of a knitted panel for the sake of one dropped stitch (easily fixed in 5 minutes, according to my Mom). Thanks to the works of Donald Maass, in an excellent workbook called The Breakout Novelist, I am able to approach the effort with some intelligence. I know enough about writing to understand that I am a fool wandering around passages in the deep cave of success, hoping that I am making the correct assumptions about how to use this map. 

 There appear to be three major issues, according to my readings, that provide opportunities to cultivate dead space. The first problem to consider is my opening—Chapter One. While meeting the stringent requirements for setting up scene, introducing character, and getting my hero moving across the page, this opening did not grab the reader’s attention, make her feel uncomfortable in anticipation of conflict, or give her any reason to turn the page. It did move my hero forward through his world, across the lawn into the college, but not into the story. In fact, the first third of the book (148 pages) does little to move his story forward, offering backstory instead, a justification of the hero’s existence, really, and a test to see if I could write the academic male viewpoint. The classic “threshold” from the hero’s journey occurs on page 149, leaving the opening stagnant and dull. Ho-hum, who cares?
 

Establishing character time and place is good but the real journey takes place elsewhere. A lot of wasted images, scenes and dialogues are in these pages—wasted on the reader, not the writer who apparently needed to experience it all so that she could see the story. The journey is a journey into his past, which happens at the place of his birth. Eventually he runs into all of the thematic elements once the journey begins. Having been explored in the opening third of the novel, these are revisited in the “special world” of the journey, a second contributor to dead space: repetition.
 

To be candid, I got into this mess by attempting to merge two stories—and two story structures—into a grand tale. The first story followed a student coming to terms with her less than perfect background in the nascent energies of women’s liberation. The second followed a socially inept young professor who aims to be a successful scholar envisioning himself rising above the poverty of his youth to become an eminent scholar in an Ivy League school. He saw himself as Percival the lad of woodsy ignorance who became a knight of the Round Table. The novelist in me wanted the story to end nicely, a quaint romance. I was of the mind that these two characters had to be become equals at the end, so that one would be worthy of the other. I proceeded to take the reader on each journey, in order to demonstrate the evolving shapes on each side of the balance.
 

Talk about repetition. Yet, by trying to develop two stories I cheated the professor of his true story and short-shifted the student of her rounded story arc as well. The ending, which forces them together, actually thwarts the theme I set out to demonstrate: that is, in order for “true” love to exist, one must park his ego and allow his heart to rule. I learned that pushing the story askew to demonstrate a pet theme is no simple task. And when it is done, the story feels forced. Many of the story’s underpinnings feel false. It is like deciding who the murderer is in the middle of your mystery and then pressing forward to wrap up without laying the necessary field case.
 

Too much concern on how the story should turn out kept me engaged in theme when I should have been paying attention to how the story was unfolding, to the here and now details of each scene, to what Maass calls the “tension on every page.”
 

By focusing on these three issues, I expect the manuscript will improve greatly, being more readable, and appealing to a greater audience, making it more publishable. First, focus on one story. Second, push backstory to the second half of the novel, and third, ensure that the conflict keeps the reader in continual distress by writing tension into every dialogue, every scene and every major turning point of the story.

 

The hero’s story is the one that demonstrates ego surrendering to heart, and so I have chosen to go with that one. Since the heroine’s story line shows her transition from leaning on the privilege of her position as a wealthy scion’s daughter to a self-sufficient adult, it becomes a subplot that enhances the hero’s transition. My work on her journey has not been entirely wasted. In its length it comprises the fodder for another novel, one where her concern for others detracts her from looking after her own self-interest. The work produced by this change is significant but not overwhelming. I have to rewrite the first chapter to resonate with a restrained focus and less expansive goals. It also requires the tightening of story structure, which will—hurrah!–reduce the final novel by at least a fourth of its size.

 

Next, every line of backstory in the first 148 pages needs to be plucked out, leaving only 6-7 pages in the first chapter. Maass suggests that backstory, if used at all, be deferred until the second half of the book. This was the lesson hardest for me to learn. I was absolutely convinced that my story made no sense to the reader who was not clued in from the beginning. I struggled with this for months, striking out then putting back in, over and over. Finally I resorted to watching film and reading novels to test his “theory”. Maass most likely had done the tests himself over time with the thousands of manuscripts he had read as an editor. I found it to be a valid tenet. Science fiction offers the most striking examples, as with Star Trek episodes, and Star Wars which drops us into the middle of the battle, <or Matrix–where the whole film is a revelation of backstory even as characters race to its conclusion. The tenet holds true in the love story, Cold Mountain, a literary example closer to my own story. The revelation of the Civil War and the hero’s displacement in his society unfolds uncomfortable on every page.
 

Maass provides the revising writer with examples that sharpen his lens, rendering abstract concepts into living experience. Working with this workbook was like having a tutor working by your side. “Tension on every page” is the most difficult of the revision tasks for me because I will have to read every line of my extant novel and evaluate its ability to move the story forward. I have to admit I am not the greatest proofreader of my own work.
 

The whole novel needs revision, a daunting task. But, while I am revising this baby, I will continue to germinate my current novel, a story that takes me back to my first love of mystery novels, to the San Francisco of my youth and to my life today on a not-so-remote island off the Pacific coast. Patches of images are cropping up every day. The dream lives on.

Leave a comment

Filed under Learning, revision work